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Plant-based Vegan

Not-for-profit investment company to help fund early-stage businesses in the plant-based food space.

Veganuary Co-Founder, Matthew Glover, launches new vegan investment fund, ‘Veg Capital’ – with all profits to go to charity! Veg Capital will provide Angel, Seed and Series A funding, with investments typically ranging from £50,000 to £250,000 to companies striving to replace the use of animals in the food system. The fund’s focus will be on companies that develop innovative plant-based and cultivated replacements to animal products, including meat, seafood, dairy and eggs.

Veg Capital is an ethical and environmental mission that seeks to reduce the burden on our planet, spare the lives of animals and create a sustainable food industry. Unlike traditional investment firms, Veg Capital plans to donate all profits to UK and European animal protection charities. 

‘Our aim is to drive up the supply of vegan foods while driving down demand for animal products. We invest in plant-based foods and then through our philanthropy help raise awareness and increase demand for that food. It’s a double whammy of activism. We’ve already provided funding to eight game-changer companies and there is much more to come!’

Matthew Glover, Managing Director, Veg Capital

Since COVID-19 began, we’ve seen plant-based product sales growth exceed that of animal-based products, both in meat and dairy categories. In the United States, sales of vegan meat jumped by a staggering 280% and sales of oat milk jumped by 477% in the second week of March compared to the same period last year, as the country became the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic. This meat crisis has become a big opportunity for plant-based protein companies that have developed healthier, safer and more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional animal products.

Veg Capital portfolio include these plant based businesses:

  1. Mighty Pea: Mighty Pea M.lk, is a smooth and creamy, dairy-free alternative to milk, made from yellow split peas. It contains more protein and calcium than regular plant milk and split peas are a sustainable solution.
  2. Grounded: GROUNDED® make 100% natural sustainably packaged plant-based protein m*lkshakes. They have ambitious plans to innovate in & disrupt the wider functional f&b space with only natural, plant-based ingredients.
  3. Mummy Meagz: Mummy Meagz creates indulgent chocolate treats including a range of vegan Rockie Road bars and have recently launched the Chuckie Egg.
  4. TheVeganKind: The UK’s leading 100% vegan online supermarket and vegan subscription service.
  5. Plantifull: Delicious plant-based meal pots and high-protein vegan jerky. 100% plant-based snacks.
  6. Native Snacks: Native Snacks are on a mission to unearth plant-based snacks from around the world. Their first product range is Popped Lotus Seeds from India.
  7. One Planet Pizza: The UK’s first frozen vegan pizza company.
  8. Good Catch: Plant-based seafood. They’re disrupting the seafood category, not the ocean’s natural resources.
  9. Vevolution: Vevolution creates inspiring events and multimedia content for the plant powered positive changemakers.

Read more at Veg Capital

Categories
Agriculture Policy

Agri-Food Pilot to ensure Food Security in Canada

The Agri-Food Pilot is conceptualised to build resilience in the agriculture sector, which sees thousands of jobs go unfilled each year. It helps address the labour needs of the Canadian agri-food sector. The pilot provides a pathway to permanent residence for experienced, non-seasonal workers in specific industries and occupations. It will run until May 2023.

The three-year pilot is an experiment by definition and that the federal government is open to ways they can improve the program and “ensure that it’s meeting the objective of recognizing those contributions — the value of the work on farms when it comes to food security — by providing a clear way [migrant workers] can establish permanent residency in Canada.”

Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino 

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada said the pilot will accept 2,750 applications annually. Eligible industries and eligible jobs under the pilot are listed below:

  • Meat product manufacturing: Retail butchers, Industrial butchers, Food processing labourers, Farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers
  • Greenhouse, nursery and floriculture production, including mushroom production: General farm workers, Harvesting labourers, Farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers
  • Animal production, excluding aquaculture: General farm workers, Farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers

Foreign workers fill an important role in the Canadian agriculture sector, where 59,000 positions went unfilled last year, according to a study from the Senate committee on agriculture and forestry. The report found that the number of unfilled positions could hit 114,000 by 2025.

Read more at iPolitics

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Food Safety Supply Chain

It’s not the food supply chain that’s breaking, it’s the meat supply chain

Supply lines across the food industry have been impacted by the coronavirus. Shuttered restaurants, university dining halls, workplace food providers, and more have all strained the food supply chain. In particular, the meat industry has suffered the hardest hit. In addition to closures of many of its largest purchasers, COVID-19 outbreaks inside meatpacking facilities have forced largest meat processing plants to shut down. The cold, damp conditions and crowded workstations in meatpacking plants make infectious diseases particularly hard to control.

On April 26, Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, closed at least six major plants. Similar covid-19 outbreaks were reported at Danish Crown A/S, a huge pork producer; Goikoa, of Spain; Sanderson Farms Inc., America’s third-largest poultry producer, and Cargill’s High River slaughterhouse outside Calgary. The whole situation is an incontrovertible nightmare. But the pandemic is an opportunity to ask more probing questions about the nature of our system of animal agriculture.

Since COVID-19 began, we’ve seen plant-based product sales growth exceed that of animal-based products, both in meat and dairy categories. In the United States, sales of vegan meat jumped by a staggering 280% and sales of oat milk jumped by 477% in the second week of March compared to the same period last year, as the country became the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic. This meat crisis has become a big opportunity for plant-based protein companies that have developed healthier, safer and more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional animal products.

Choosing a plant-based diet is one of the best things you can do for the environment as plant-based diets are kind to the earth and kind to animals. As is the case with plant-based meat, plant-based dairy supply chains are much better poised to respond in real-time to changing market conditions and are not vulnerable to the type of disruptions inherent in industrial animal agriculture.

Categories
Investments

Growthwell Group raises US$8 m for scale-up of plant-based alternatives

Growthwell, a leading manufacturer of plant-based alternatives for meat and seafood for the South East Asian market, announced that it has raised US$8 million in a funding round led by Temasek, with other investors DSG Consumer Partners, Insignia Ventures, Genesis Ventures, Brandify and Mr Koh Boon Hwee participating. The proceeds from this funding round will accelerate Growthwell’s growth into alternative proteins and future food solutions, taking its vision of sustainable plant-based choices to a global stage.

Growthwell’s growth plans include the setup of an end-to-end technology centre in Singapore focusing on R&D and manufacturing. Growthwell’s vision is to be Asia’s leading plant nutrition food tech company, with an aim to care for 100 million lives with sustainable and nutritious plant-based choices while reducing the world’s overall meat consumption.

Read more at MediaOutReach

Categories
Policy

European Commission announces exceptional measures to support the agri-food sector

The Commission is taking swift action and proposes additional exceptional measures to further support agricultural and food markets most affected. The package includes measures for private storage aid (PSA) in the dairy and meat sectors, the authorisation of self-organisation market measures by operators in hard hit sectors and flexibility in fruits and vegetables, wine and some other market support programmes.

Exceptional measures announced as a further response to the Coronavirus crisis include:

  1. Private storage aid: the Commission proposes to grant private storage aid for dairy (skimmed milk powder, butter, cheese) and meat (beef, sheep and goat meat) products. This measure will lead to a decrease of available supply on the market and rebalance the market on the long-term.
  2. Flexibility for market support programmes: the Commission will introduce flexibility in the implementation of market support programmes for wine, fruits and vegetables, olive oil, apiculture and the EU’s school scheme (milk, fruits and vegetables). This will allow the reorientation of funding priorities towards crisis management measures for all the sectors.
  3. Exceptional derogation from EU competition rules: applicable to the milk, flowers and potatoes sectors, the Commission will authorise the derogation from certain competition rules. For example, the milk sector will be allowed to collectively plan milk production and the flower and potatoes sector will be allowed to withdraw products from the market.

Such agreements and decisions would only be valid for a period of maximum six months. Consumer price movements will be monitored closely to avoid adverse effects.

Read more at European Commission

Categories
Uncategorized

North American agri suffers as beef processing plants close

The increasing closure of meat processing plants in the US and Canada amidst the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, will have a marked impact on the agricultural economies in those countries. The meat processing and packing plants were reportedly closing down because staff members were testing positive for COVID-19. This included plants run by some of the industry’s largest stakeholders, including Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods and JBS USA.

The recent closures of several meat processing plants could mean a significant change in how companies looked at inventory. Companies had evolved into a just-in-time inventory system, in order to reduce costs, increase efficiency and speed. This could change in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and restricted access to food supplies.

Read more at Farmer’s Weekly

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Uncategorized

U.S. to Buy Milk and Meat as Part of $15.5 Billion Aid

The Trump administration would like to make purchases of milk and meat products as part of a $15.5 billion initial aid package to farmers rattled by the coronavirus, said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. We want to purchase as much of this milk, or other protein products, hams and pork products, and move them into where they can be utilized in our food banks, or possibly even into international humanitarian aid. The combination of direct payments to farmers and bulk government purchases of commodities parallels the approach the Trump administration followed in its $28 billion agriculture trade bailout over the past two years. The coronavirus relief bill Congress passed last month includes $23.5 billion in aid for farmers.

Read more at Bloomberg