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FoodTech Webinar

Expert Talk: How Foodtech is Disrupting Through Sustainable Meat Alternatives

By 2040, more than 60% of the global meat consumption will be lead by alternative meats. That’s a market value of 1,000 billion USD. Are you ready to lead the change within the industry? Come join a special panel on Wed, 08.07.2020, 6PM CEST sponsored by Stryber, an independent corporate venture builder based in Munich, London, Zurich, and Kiev. The webinar will primarily focus on

  1. Industry outlook from successful founders, investors and industry experts
  2. About building a million-USD funded startups and the first lab-grown hamburger
  3. Future market and investment trends

Who is the webinar for?

  1. For corporations & innovators: Do you work in a corporate group or are you involved in innovation in the F&B sector? Gain insights into the meat replacement industry and hear how to innovate successfully.
  2. For founders & entrepreneurs: You already started a meat alternative startup or have an idea? Learn from our experts on how they have mastered the problems you are also struggling with.
  3. For the curious & inquisitive: Are you curious about meat alternatives and the most disruptive innovations? Get insights from real industry insiders: how they think, act and became successful.

You can register for the webinar by submitting your information on the link below.

The panel and discussion will address questions including:

  1. What are the most disrupting trends in the meat industry?
  2. How will the future of meat look like?
  3. Are consumers ready for lab-made meat?

The Speakers:

Ross Mackay, CEO & Co-Founder, Daring Foods: Ross is a Scottish serial entrepreneur now living in the US. He is the Co-Founder and CEO of daring, a plant-based chicken startup that just closed a second round of investment after their first round of $10m USD. Ross is reimagining chicken with the mission to offer a healthier, tastier and more environmentally cautious alternative to meat that is creating a new vegan food experience which is inclusive for all.

Frea Mehta, Biophysics PhD, LMU: Frea is an experimental biophysics researcher at the LMU Munich. She has firsthand experience in the field of cultured meat research as a Fulbright scholar in the lab of Dr. Mark Post at Maastricht University, where the world’s first lab-grown hamburger was born. She is an active science communicator on the topic of cultured meat and biotechnology solutions in food and agriculture.

Garan Goodman, Associate Partner, Stryber: Garan is a Partner at Stryber aiming to strategically accelerate corporate’s innovation efforts. He previously was the Managing Director of the METRO Target Retail Program for 8 late stage retail startups and Managing Director of the Telefonica startup program Wayra Deutschland GmbH where he oversaw the investment and acceleration activity of 35 companies including the last mile delivery giant Foodora.

David Blake Walker, CEO & Founder, BOONIAN: David is an Interior Architekt, Entrepreneur and all around Creative from the U.S currently residing in Munich. He graduated from Kansas State University with a BFA in Interior Architecture. The day after graduation he packed his drum set in his pick-up and hit the road for New York City where he worked for Richard Meier which subsequently brought him to Munich. Since then he has developed a reputation for his creativity and gastronomy projects.

Categories
FoodTech Plant-based

FoodTech startup, Heartbest, raised US$2 million in Series A funding

Heartbest Foods, the foodtech startup from Mexico has secured an investment of US$2 million from venture capital fund Blue Horizon Ventures. The company has been working with ingredients like amaranth, quinoa, and peas to develop vegan dairy products like milk and cheese. Heartbest Foods, founded in 2017, can currently be found in retailers like Soriana, Chedraui and Costco throughout Mexico.

Heartbest Foods seek to empower people to make a positive impact on their health and the environment in a delicious and effortless way thanks to our products. They start with little questions for great answers:

  1. Why do we need animals to create any kind of food? 
  2. Why can’t we build foods that have the same texture and flavor from plants and be part of solutions aimed at health and climate change?
  3. How can we generate a healthier and more sustainable industry?

It is estimated that 900 gallons of water are required to produce 1 lb of cheese and 17.6 pounds of CO2 needed to produce one gallon of milk. Heartbest foods claim to produce same amount of Cheese with 10 times less water and milk with 60% less emissions. Heartbest managed to significantly impact four of the main problems attributed to intensive livestock farming and consumption: people’s well-being, climate change, efficient use of resources and eliminate animal abuse.

Blue Horizon Ventures, the venture fund backing Heartbest, is a food technology-focused venture capital fund founded in 2018 by serial entrepreneurs and investors Roger Lienhard and Michael Kleindl. The fund aims to support the movement towards a more sustainable food system through innovation, technology and entrepreneurship. Plant based proteins and cellular agriculture (clean meat) are the main focus areas.

The existing food system is broken. It needs massive and quick change to enable the planet to feed its ever growing population over the next decades and to stop the devastating environmental impact of animal agriculture. More and more entrepreneurs are tackling these issues starting very promising companies with a need for financing and thus creating fantastic investment opportunities for investors and so Blue Horizon Ventures.

Investment Thesis, Blue Horizon Ventures.

The closing of these investments in the midst of Covid-19 indicates that the movement towards a more sustainable world at large, and specifically in the food system, is only accelerating and confirms the need to act now.

Read more at Just-Food.

Categories
Biotech FoodTech

Alt-food startup Biomilq raised $3.5 million in funding from Breakthrough Energy Ventures

An artificial breast milk company, based in Durham, North Carolina, has received $3.5 (£2.8) million from Breakthough Energy Ventures, an investment fund co-founded by Bill Gates. Biomilq was co-founded by Leila Strickland PhD, an accomplished cell biologist, and Michelle Egger MBA, an experienced food scientist. The company is on a mission to provide the next generation every opportunity to thrive by producing cultured breastmilk that offers supplemental nutrition to mother’s milk with the convenience of formula.

Breakthough Energy Ventures’ investing coalition includes Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Branson, Masayoshi Son, Jack Ma, Michael Bloomberg and Marc Benioff. The $1 billion fund, Breakthrough Energy Ventures, was established to help prevent the worst effects of climate change arising from carbon emissions.

Breastfeeding is one of the most effective ways to ensure healthy development in children. But exclusive breastfeeding is unrealistic for some and impossible for many— due to low milk production, medical reasons, incompatible workplaces, or the ongoing stigma around breastfeeding in public. As per estimates, more than 4 out of 5 moms have to stop breastfeeding before the recommended six months.

That means the vast majority of us are turning to dairy-based formula. And that means many of us face serious trade-offs, as infant formula lacks the critical nutrients of breastmilk and carries a heavy environmental burden. Parents and caregivers are left with suboptimal choices, which is why biomilq is developing this option that doesn’t force a trade-off between babies’ nutrition and mothers’ wellbeing.

Biomilq co-founders, CEO Michelle Egger and CSO Leila Strickland hope that the breast milk produced by Biomilq from culturing mammary epithelial cells will help reduce the carbon footprint from the global infant formula market. While the pair unveiled their proof of concept in February, Eggers says they’re still in the early stages and they hope to have a product on store shelves within five years.

Read more at Biomilq

Categories
Articles

Factory Farming – A glimpse of future of agriculture

Farming is going to be the next Manufacturing. Farms, are becoming more like factories: tightly controlled operations for turning out reliable products, immune as far as possible from the vagaries of nature. By 2050, the planet’s population is likely to rise to 9.7 billion, a rise of 2 billion from now. Along with increase in population, there is a substantial increase in the lifestyle. Those people will not only need to eat, they will want to eat better than people do now, because of higher incomes. Since most land suitable for farming is already farmed, this growth must come from higher yields.

What are the changes happening in the way we grow our food?

  1. Protected cultivation: By growing plants in warehouses, shipping containers, and city-adjacent greenhouses, next-gen farmers claim they are able to eliminate the threat of unpredictable weather, waste less water, reduce transportation costs and fasten the production cycle.
  2. Data driven agriculture: Farming is becoming a branch of matrix algebra. Farm operations involve a set of variables, such as the weather, soil’s moisture levels and nutrient content, competition to crops from weeds, threats to their health from pests and diseases, and the costs of taking action to deal with these things. If the algebra is done correctly, the yield gets optimised resulting in maximization of profit.
  3. Lab grown meat: There may be an even better way to grow meat, the animal tissue most wanted by consumers, than on animals themselves. This means growing the cells in reactor vessels filled with nutrient broth. To make it similar to animal meat, the cells must be attached to fat and other related components, so the idea is to grow them on small spheres floating in the vessels. Fat cells, which add juiciness to meat, are cultured separately. Whether it’s chicken created in the lab, crickets and beetles ground up in energy bars or plant-based burgers that ‘bleed’ there’s no shortage of innovation when it comes to alternative proteins.
  4. Synthetic eggs: Researchers are developing synthetic egg white, using transgenic yeast to secrete the required proteins. Indeed, they hope to improve on natural egg white by tweaking the protein mix. They also hope their synthetic white will be acceptable to people vegans and some vegetarians, who do not currently eat eggs.
  5. Leather grown using biotechnology: Factory-grown leather promises several advantages over skins taken from animals. One is that it can be made in convenient sheets with straight edges, rather than being constrained by the irregular shapes that animals come in. Another is that it is more consistent than the natural stuff. It is devoid of the scars, marks and other defects to which real skin is inevitably prone.
Categories
Uncategorized

Cellular Agriculture – cell-based technology to produce milk.

Cell-based processes of creating clean milk completely bypass the environmental degradation and animal welfare issues of industrial dairy. The approach has the ability to match nutritional content, taste, and quality of milk obtained traditionally. Acellular technology works by culturing mammary cells in vitro and inducing their natural ability to produce all components of milk. The first step involves obtaining stem cells from sources such as milk. They are then transferred into an environment where they convert into mammary gland cells. The mammary gland cells interact with a special formula which causes the cells to lactate. The end product – milk is obtained through a filtration process.

Milk from plants like almond, soy and oat is increasingly popular as a good source of protein. However, the milk from these alternative sources lacks one or more components of dairy milk, therefore, are not able to recreate the functionality of milk, translating to other dairy products like cheese, butter and yoghurt.

Read more at Technology Networks