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Agriculture Fisheries

‘Survive, reboot, and grow,’ is the ‘new normal’

Amid the challenges in global food systems due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Department of Agriculture (DA), Philippines, is ready to take on the challenge of the ‘new normal’ facing the country’s agriculture and fishery sector. It is imperative for the government to rethink and restructure its policies and practices to prevent from being overwhelmed by future crisis. DA is considering a three-pronged strategy to bring agriculture back to normalcy.

  1. We must simply surpass this global crisis.
  2. We must reboot and reform our agricultural policies, and refocus our priorities to minimize the adverse effects.
  3. The agriculture and fishery sector must grow, by attracting more investments and resources, and partnering with the private sector.

Together, we will survive, reboot, and grow toward a food-secured nation.

Read more at Philippine Information Agency

Categories
Fisheries

Fish skin leather: artisans and designers are breathing new life into the tradition

Fish skin leather used to be commonplace in many cultures. As practical and pervasive as the material was, the practice of making fish skin leather faded in the 20th century. Its loss is intertwined with colonialism and assimilation. Now, it’s making a comeback. Fish skin leather is also emerging as a commodity in the world of fashion; in recent years, the material has caught the eye of designers who want to incorporate it into luxury items.

Commercial interest in fish skin leather is partly a result of consumers’ environmental and ethical concerns about the global leather supply chain. Most conventional leather like snakeskin and alligator skin is produced using harsh chemicals, such as chromium salts, which cause respiratory ailments and persistent skin ulcers in tannery workers.

Making fish skin leather is a gentler process than making conventional leather. It requires fewer harsh chemicals. Fish skin is a byproduct of the food industry that often goes to waste. Every tonne of filleted fish amounts to about 40 kilograms of skins. Fish skin leather is thin but remarkably strong because its fibers crisscross.

The revival of fish skin leather is more than the rediscovery of a craft. In a time of environmental crises, using local resources to their full extent may be an idea worth reviving.

Read more at Hakai Magazine

Categories
Policy

Young millennials as the future of Philippine agriculture

The Department of Agriculture (DA), Philippines, is set to engage 900 fresh graduates (batch 2019-2020) as ‘frontliners’ to assist in the implementation of agriculture programs in each congressional district nationwide. Millennials will be tapped as on-the-job trainees (OJTs) for about six months, given an attractive allowance, and later will get employed and detailed at each congressional district under the DA-Agricultural Program Coordinating Offices (APCOs). Each province has a DA-APCO that coordinates with local government units in the implementation of agricultural banner programs — rice, corn, high value crops, livestock (small and large ruminants) and poultry. It makes recommendations and conducts monitoring services to ensure that national and regional DA policies and programs are effectively and efficiently cascaded at the local level.

Eventually, when their OJT stint is over they can develop their respective agri-fishery business plan to be pursued as a project in their own localities. The initiative is being tied up with the DA’s Kapital Access for Young Agripreneurs (KAYA), a loan program launched in January 2020 to entice young Filipinos to engage in farming and fishery ventures and agribusiness and food processing enterprises. Under the management of the DA-Agricultural Credit Policy Council (ACPC), the KAYA financing program, with a total funding of P1B, lends P300,000 to P500,000 per borrower, payable in five years at zero interest.

Read more at Philippine Information Agency

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Uncategorized

Genetics expertise could transform fish production

The potential of fish and shellfish production to feed a growing global population could be significantly enhanced through advances in genetics and biotechnology. Most aquaculture species can produce many offspring, and large populations with improved genetics can be bred quickly for improved production performance. Farmed fish is on course to overcome wild fish as the main source of seafood, and consequently genetic tools and expertise are in high demand to increase the efficiency and sustainability of aquaculture systems, which currently rely mostly on unselected stocks.

In the future, technologies such as genome editing could be used to introduce desirable traits, such as disease resistance, into farmed species, and surrogate breeding could be employed to support production of preferred species.

Read more at phys.org

Categories
Fisheries

Fish Protein Hydrolysate Market Overview

Fish protein hydrolysates is an amino product as it contains high concentration of natural protein. They are manufactured using hydrolysis reaction on protein bonds which results in quick absorbing protein solutions. They are widely used in animal feed products as they aid in boosting the metabolic system against infections and reduce outbreak of diseases which is likely to foster fish protein hydrolysate market outlook. Fish Protein Hydrolysates Market size exceeded USD 420 million, globally in 2019 and is estimated to grow at over 4.5% CAGR between 2020 and 2026. Increasing disposable income & rising demand for easily digestible and high-quality protein powders will fuel the global industry growth.

Fish protein hydrolysate market is competitive and major industry players include SOPROPECHE, Diana Aqua, Copalis Sea Solutions, Scanbio, TripleNine, Hofseth Biocare, Bio-Marine Ingredients, United Fish, Weishardt and Omega Protein, 3D Corporate Solutions, Sociedad Pesquera Landes Sa, Janatha Fish Meal & Oil Products, Nutrifish, Drammatic Organic Fertilizer, Shenzhen Taier Biotechnology, TC Union Agrotech and United Fisheries.

Read more at Global Market Insights

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Uncategorized

April Fish Day?

While the exact origins remain a mystery, for many a century, 1st of April has been celebrated as April Fools day. Some believe it had its roots in the sixteenth century when, by order of the Council of Trent, France switched to the Gregorian calendar, which moved the beginning of the calendar year back to January 1st instead of the previous practice of beginning the new year just after the vernal equinox at the end of March. Those who failed to “get with the times” were labeled April Fools or, in this case, “poisson d’avril,” literally April Fish, insinuating they were gullible fish that were easily caught. Ah, those French are such pranksters. Regardless, it is a tradition that remains today in many a culture, generally celebrated with harmless pranks and jokes.

Read more at AgWeb

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Uncategorized

A lucky fish?

The Asian arowana is a freshwater fish distributed geographically across Southwest Asia. Certain varieties of the Asian arowana have become one of the world’s most expensive aquarium additions. Habitat loss continues to make some varieties of this slowly reproducing species endangered in the wild. An albino adult, which can grow up to 3 feet or more in length, may sell for $70,000 and some specimens have been rumored to fetch up to $300,000 or more. While not all are priced in the six figures, a young Asian arowana in Singapore could easily bring $300. This fish also requires a gargantuan aquarium since it is a strong powerful swimmer, can be fairly aggressive at times and can grow to weigh in excess of 13 pounds. When raised in captivity, it can have a lifespan of 10 to 15 years.

Read more at Pilot-Tribune & Enterprise