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Plant-based Vegan

Not-for-profit investment company to help fund early-stage businesses in the plant-based food space.

Veganuary Co-Founder, Matthew Glover, launches new vegan investment fund, ‘Veg Capital’ – with all profits to go to charity! Veg Capital will provide Angel, Seed and Series A funding, with investments typically ranging from £50,000 to £250,000 to companies striving to replace the use of animals in the food system. The fund’s focus will be on companies that develop innovative plant-based and cultivated replacements to animal products, including meat, seafood, dairy and eggs.

Veg Capital is an ethical and environmental mission that seeks to reduce the burden on our planet, spare the lives of animals and create a sustainable food industry. Unlike traditional investment firms, Veg Capital plans to donate all profits to UK and European animal protection charities. 

‘Our aim is to drive up the supply of vegan foods while driving down demand for animal products. We invest in plant-based foods and then through our philanthropy help raise awareness and increase demand for that food. It’s a double whammy of activism. We’ve already provided funding to eight game-changer companies and there is much more to come!’

Matthew Glover, Managing Director, Veg Capital

Since COVID-19 began, we’ve seen plant-based product sales growth exceed that of animal-based products, both in meat and dairy categories. In the United States, sales of vegan meat jumped by a staggering 280% and sales of oat milk jumped by 477% in the second week of March compared to the same period last year, as the country became the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic. This meat crisis has become a big opportunity for plant-based protein companies that have developed healthier, safer and more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional animal products.

Veg Capital portfolio include these plant based businesses:

  1. Mighty Pea: Mighty Pea M.lk, is a smooth and creamy, dairy-free alternative to milk, made from yellow split peas. It contains more protein and calcium than regular plant milk and split peas are a sustainable solution.
  2. Grounded: GROUNDED® make 100% natural sustainably packaged plant-based protein m*lkshakes. They have ambitious plans to innovate in & disrupt the wider functional f&b space with only natural, plant-based ingredients.
  3. Mummy Meagz: Mummy Meagz creates indulgent chocolate treats including a range of vegan Rockie Road bars and have recently launched the Chuckie Egg.
  4. TheVeganKind: The UK’s leading 100% vegan online supermarket and vegan subscription service.
  5. Plantifull: Delicious plant-based meal pots and high-protein vegan jerky. 100% plant-based snacks.
  6. Native Snacks: Native Snacks are on a mission to unearth plant-based snacks from around the world. Their first product range is Popped Lotus Seeds from India.
  7. One Planet Pizza: The UK’s first frozen vegan pizza company.
  8. Good Catch: Plant-based seafood. They’re disrupting the seafood category, not the ocean’s natural resources.
  9. Vevolution: Vevolution creates inspiring events and multimedia content for the plant powered positive changemakers.

Read more at Veg Capital

Categories
Food Safety Supply Chain

It’s not the food supply chain that’s breaking, it’s the meat supply chain

Supply lines across the food industry have been impacted by the coronavirus. Shuttered restaurants, university dining halls, workplace food providers, and more have all strained the food supply chain. In particular, the meat industry has suffered the hardest hit. In addition to closures of many of its largest purchasers, COVID-19 outbreaks inside meatpacking facilities have forced largest meat processing plants to shut down. The cold, damp conditions and crowded workstations in meatpacking plants make infectious diseases particularly hard to control.

On April 26, Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, closed at least six major plants. Similar covid-19 outbreaks were reported at Danish Crown A/S, a huge pork producer; Goikoa, of Spain; Sanderson Farms Inc., America’s third-largest poultry producer, and Cargill’s High River slaughterhouse outside Calgary. The whole situation is an incontrovertible nightmare. But the pandemic is an opportunity to ask more probing questions about the nature of our system of animal agriculture.

Since COVID-19 began, we’ve seen plant-based product sales growth exceed that of animal-based products, both in meat and dairy categories. In the United States, sales of vegan meat jumped by a staggering 280% and sales of oat milk jumped by 477% in the second week of March compared to the same period last year, as the country became the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic. This meat crisis has become a big opportunity for plant-based protein companies that have developed healthier, safer and more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional animal products.

Choosing a plant-based diet is one of the best things you can do for the environment as plant-based diets are kind to the earth and kind to animals. As is the case with plant-based meat, plant-based dairy supply chains are much better poised to respond in real-time to changing market conditions and are not vulnerable to the type of disruptions inherent in industrial animal agriculture.

Categories
Milk

FDA has given dairies the official permission to label their skim milk as “skim milk.”

Skim milk is milk with the fat or cream removed—skimmed off. According to FDA guidelines, in order to be called “skim milk,” dairies had to add vitamins A and D to the milk before it could be lawfully distributed. Dairies or creameries who did not add those vitamins were prohibited from labeling their skim milk as skim milk. Instead, they were required to call it “imitation skim milk” or “imitation milk product,” even though their skim milk was not, in fact, an imitation of anything.

The letter that the US FDA sent on April 22, 2020 informed South Mountain Creamery LLC that the agency will no longer enforce the “imitation” labeling requirement and will no longer ask the states to enforce it.

There’s a market for “all-natural” skim milk without the added vitamins, and dairies and creameries who want to offer this product have been battling federal and state regulators for years. “Words mean what the public understands them to mean, not what the government wishes they meant,” said IJ Attorney Anya Bidwell.

Read more at Institute for Justice

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Uncategorized

Cellular Agriculture – cell-based technology to produce milk.

Cell-based processes of creating clean milk completely bypass the environmental degradation and animal welfare issues of industrial dairy. The approach has the ability to match nutritional content, taste, and quality of milk obtained traditionally. Acellular technology works by culturing mammary cells in vitro and inducing their natural ability to produce all components of milk. The first step involves obtaining stem cells from sources such as milk. They are then transferred into an environment where they convert into mammary gland cells. The mammary gland cells interact with a special formula which causes the cells to lactate. The end product – milk is obtained through a filtration process.

Milk from plants like almond, soy and oat is increasingly popular as a good source of protein. However, the milk from these alternative sources lacks one or more components of dairy milk, therefore, are not able to recreate the functionality of milk, translating to other dairy products like cheese, butter and yoghurt.

Read more at Technology Networks

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Uncategorized

Coffee, but not as you know it

In a world of alternatives – whether it’s oat ‘milk’, meatless ‘meat’, or elderberry flavoured tea, it should come as no surprise that an alternative ‘coffee bean’ has also emerged. Peanut coffee resembles traditional coffee in the way it smells, tastes and the way it is prepared. As peanuts are legumes much like coffee beans, mimicking the flavour of coffee is a relatively simple task. Furthermore, peanut coffee is not acidic, so it is very smooth to drink and good for people with acid reflux; it is also not a diuretic! The flavour of peanut coffee is largely contributed to the roast temperature/time and the oil extraction rate.

Read more at New Food

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Uncategorized

What is oat milk?

Oat milk is milk made from oats — not a hard name to decipher. But there is something special about oat milk compared to other alternative milks: It’s actually thick and creamy like full-fat cow’s milk, but without the same amount of fat, calories and lactose in dairy milk. Other plant-based milks, such as almond and cashew, tend to be watery or on the verge of flavorless, whereas oat milk is richer in both taste and texture. Oat milk is made by soaking oats in water, blending the mixture and straining the mixture to remove the pulp. Mass-produced oat milk also requires use of food additives to achieve the desired texture and nutritional quality, as well as shelf stability for non-refrigerated versions. Oat milk can be a good choice for people who have lactose intolerance, nut allergies or soy allergies, in which case dairy milk, soy milk and nut milk are off the table.

Read more at CNET